Prehistoric times

The development of a monumental or representative architecture requires ample resources, and in historical times as poor Norway is similar poor in this area. An exception forms, however, the burial mounds, which had a flowering period of the Iron Age. In a unique position stand Raknehaugen in Romerike in Akershus (ca. 400-600 AD), which is one of Northern Europe's largest.

In the remote Norway has however been able to experience traditional and distinctive folk building looks high quality and with three as the dominant material. One of the oldest houses tried reconstructed, the Bronze Age house in Forsand from approx. 1000 BC Another example of a reconstructed prehistoric buildings are Ullandhaug in Rome from 400 - and 500-century AD The buildings have been clustered on farms for large families or clans, were usually narrow and sometimes very long, with room for both people and livestock. The sod roofs have been carried by two rows of poles inside the room, the walls of loose masonry on the ground stone of these districts are so rich, internally provided with a cladding of upright planks - at least in certain cases. Another building method that has a very long history in our country, are the tent and hut structures that the Sami have used right up to our days.
Viking Age

The Vikings' homes seem largely to have been the longhouse. An example is the reconstructed building at Borg in Lofoten from 600 - to 800-number. By Viking houses are almost no remains extant, but they have NOK called a refinement of the ancient house, now with the end of rafters carried by poles in the outer wall, only with planks inserted between them, possibly with an insulating layer of peat stacked outside ( see toast). Probably it is the end of the Viking Age that these rod structures have been replaced with the construction of the logs would become almost supreme in the country until about the middle of the 1800s. In the pilot-in stavløene on the west coast, however, spell the structure has been preserved as a living tradition.

The development of a monumental or representative architecture requires ample resources, and in historical times as poor Norway is similar poor in this area. An exception forms, however, the burial mounds, which had a flowering period of the Iron Age. In a unique position stand Raknehaugen in Romerike in Akershus (ca. 400-600 AD), which is one of Northern Europe's largest.